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resolved – auditd STDERR: Error deleting rule Error sending enable request (Operation not permitted)

September 19th, 2014

Today when I try to restart auditd, the following error message prompted:

[2014-09-18T19:26:41+00:00] ERROR: service[auditd] (cookbook-devops-kernelaudit::default line 14) had an error: Mixlib::ShellOut::ShellCommandFailed: Expected process to exit with [0], but received '1'
---- Begin output of /sbin/service auditd restart ----
STDOUT: Stopping auditd: [  OK  ]
Starting auditd: [FAILED]
STDERR: Error deleting rule (Operation not permitted)
Error sending enable request (Operation not permitted)
---- End output of /sbin/service auditd restart ----
Ran /sbin/service auditd restart returned 1

After some reading of manpage auditd, I realized that when audit "enabled" was set to 2(locked), any attempt to change the configuration in this mode will be audited and denied. And that maybe the reason of "STDERR: Error deleting rule (Operation not permitted)", "Error sending enable request (Operation not permitted)". Here's from man page of auditctl:

-e [0..2] Set enabled flag. When 0 is passed, this can be used to temporarily disable auditing. When 1 is passed as an argument, it will enable auditing. To lock the audit configuration so that it can't be changed, pass a 2 as the argument. Locking the configuration is intended to be the last command in audit.rules for anyone wishing this feature to be active. Any attempt to change the configuration in this mode will be audited and denied. The configuration can only be changed by rebooting the machine.

You can run auditctl -s to check the current setting:

[root@centos-doxer ~]# auditctl -s
AUDIT_STATUS: enabled=1 flag=1 pid=3154 rate_limit=0 backlog_limit=320 lost=0 backlog=0

And you can run auditctl -e <0|1|2> to change this attribute on the fly, or you can add -e <0|1|2> in /etc/audit/audit.rules. Please note after you modify this, a reboot is a must to make this into effect.

PS:

Here's more about linux audit.

Good Luck!


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